top of page

The Many Benefits of Pilates for Mind and Body: A Scientific Perspective






Pilates is a low-impact exercise that focuses on strengthening the core muscles, improving balance and flexibility, and enhancing overall physical and mental wellbeing. While Pilates has been around for almost a century, its popularity has surged in recent years due to its numerous benefits. In this blog, we will explore the scientific evidence behind the benefits of Pilates for the mind and body.


1. Improved flexibility and balance


Pilates has been shown to improve flexibility and balance. A study published in the Journal of Sports Science and Medicine found that 12 weeks of Pilates training improved balance, flexibility, and posture in elderly women. Another study published in the Journal of Physical Therapy Science found that six weeks of Pilates training improved flexibility and balance in women with low back pain.


2. Reduced stress and anxiety


Pilates has also been found to reduce stress and anxiety. A study published in the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies found that 12 weeks of Pilates training reduced stress and improved mood in healthy adults. Similarly, a study published in the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies found that eight weeks of Pilates training reduced anxiety in healthy women.


3. Improved core strength and posture


Pilates is well-known for its emphasis on core strength and posture. A study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that 10 weeks of Pilates training improved abdominal strength and endurance in women. Another study published in the Journal of Physical Therapy Science found that eight weeks of Pilates training improved posture and decreased low back pain in women.


4. Reduced chronic pain


Pilates has been found to be an effective form of exercise for reducing chronic pain. A study published in the Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation found that eight weeks of Pilates training reduced chronic low back pain in adults. Another study published in the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies found that six weeks of Pilates training reduced chronic neck pain in women.


These are just a few examples of the many benefits of Pilates for the mind and body. The evidence suggests that Pilates can be an effective form of exercise for improving flexibility, balance, core strength, posture, and reducing stress, anxiety, and chronic pain. If you're looking for a low-impact exercise that can improve your overall physical and mental wellbeing, Pilates might be worth exploring.



References:

- Cruz-Ferreira, A., Fernandes, J., Gomes, D., Bernardo, L. M., Kirkcaldy, B. D., & Barbosa, T. M. (2011). Effects of Pilates-based exercise on life satisfaction, physical self-concept and health status in adult women. Women & health, 51(3), 240-255.

- Han, D. S., & Chang, K. V. (2018). Comparison of the effects of 1: 1 Pilates and yoga programs on various functional outcomes of elderly women. Journal of sports science & medicine, 17(2), 291.

- La Touche, R., Escalante, K., Linares, M. T., Navarro, B., & De-la-Hoz, J. L. (2018). Effectiveness of Pilates method versus other forms of exercise in adults with chronic low back pain: A systematic review. Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation, 99(8), 1621-1632.

- Suh, S. M., Lee, Y. S., & Jung, J. W. (2018). Effects of pilates exercise on lumbar stability and flexibility in chronic low back pain patients. Journal of physical therapy science, 30

コメント


bottom of page